Magic Spell Jar Post Ten (36 – 40)

36. Wait, Weight

Wait means to hang around until someone has time for you – or until something is about to begin – or to serve people, as a waiter

Weight is what most people seem to be battling.  It measures how much gravity pulls on you.  This weight has an eight in it but it in a perfect world, it would have an ate in it. Sorry, bad pun.

37. Wined and Whined

Wined is often used in the phrase “wined and dined.” It means someone treated someone else to a fancy dinner served with wine.

Whined is to fuss and moan – He whined over the loss of his glove.

38. Stalk, Stock (Pronounced similarly)

Stalk is the main stem of a plant, but can also mean following someone, usually stealthily and with bad intentions. The lion stalked the antelope hoping for dinner.

Stock can mean cows or other domestic animals (as in live stock). It can also mean goods (usually for sale). Used as a verb it means to place good somewhere (She stocked the shelves with toothpaste and other dental products)

39. Feint, Faint (pronounced similarly)

Feint – I saw this misused in a book recently – Feint is to make a misleading (feigned) move usually when boxing. Feint with your left, then lead with your right.

Faint – Is unclear, not distinct or it can be passing out (He fainted from dehydration)

40. Your, You’re, Yore — Probably the most commonly misused words on web sites are your and you’re.

Your is a possessive pronoun. When talking about something that is owned by the other person use your. This is your bat. Your answer is incorrect. Your activities are amazing.

You’re is a contraction meaning you are. You’re acting silly. If you’re going with  me, be ready in ten minutes.

Yore is not used as often as the other two spellings. Yore refers to time gone by, usually far in the past. In times of yore, knights jousted with lances. Though dangerous and often fatal, jousting was a form of entertainment.

Should you use your or you’re in the comment you’re typing? Usually it is  easy to decide. Just read your comment saying you are. If that doesn’t seem correct, you probably want to use your, not you’re..

Spell Jar Post Seven (31 to 36)

31. That, Who – These are what I call “refer back” pronouns

Who refers back to a person.  The man who flew into space came back a week later.

That refers back to a place or an animal.  The red spotted dog is the one that bit me.

If you use either in the other way (like the man that or the dog who), you are conferring properties upon the noun – making the man a thing and the dog a person.

32. Threw, Through – These words sound alike but their meanings are not alike.

Threw means tossed, like she threw the ball to first base.  He threw the ball and broke a window. This is also the word you would use in ‘he threw the game’ meaning he deliberately let the other team win.

Through means went into and came out a different side, as in the ball didn’t go to the first baseman, but instead went through the rose bushes. She walked through the door.

33. Way, Weigh, Whey – I recently saw one of these words used incorrectly – you do not way in when offering your opinion, you weigh in. If you are measuring your weight before a wrestling match, you also weigh in.

Way has a multitude of meanings. It can be a path (on the way, by the wayside), it can mean extensive (that’s way to much), or direction (which way to Grandma’s House) and more

Weigh is a measurement of mass versus gravity. How much do you weigh?  Or as mentioned above it can mean offering an opinion. He weighed in on the discussion.

Whey is a dairy by-product.  You may be familiar with this line from a poem: “Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet, eating her curds and whey.”  A lot of weird words show up in that line –  a tuffet is a stool, curds are like cottage cheese, and the whey can be either the liquidy runny part of cottage cheese or the thinner excess of that liquid which can be a drink.  But these days whey is generally used in processed foods.

34. Wear, Ware, Where – These words should have a subtle difference in pronunciation, but usually do not.

Wear is to use clothing or other adornments.  Another meaning is to show use as in there is a lot of wear on that tire.

Ware is sometimes used in place of beware, but that is colloquial (old) usage.  It is also a type of goods, like housewares – usables in the kitchen usually.  Turn it around and you have warehouse which is a place to store items (wares).

Where is actually a pronoun refering to a place. Where did you put my socks? Here’s another use: wherewithall . It means sort of like sense or awareness. I wonder if she has the wherewithall to survive those conditions.

Look them up to find other meanings.

35. Wonder, Wander –

Wonder is to contemplate, think about, or mentally be in awe. I wonder if I’ll this is a good thing.(contemplate) And here’s a usage most will find familiar: and what to my wondering (awe stricken) eyes should appear . . .

Wander is to travel in an unplanned manner or just to travel. She wandered off alone. She spent her life wandering the world. The child wandered off and became lost. In class, her mind wandered off the subject.

Magic Spell Jar Post Six (26-30)

     26. Sight, Site, Cite – these all sound alike but have different meanings

  • Sight is the function of your eyes or sometimes what you see, like “What a sight he was in his swimming trunks.”
  • Site is a place.  The site on which the house was built.  The construction worker went to the site of his job.  Or you may go to a web site, never a web sight, although people often mistakenly spell it that way.  Don’t you do it, now that you know the difference.
  • Cite is what the police do to people who are caught speeding.  They stop you and cite you for your reckless driving.  The document they serve you with is a citation.

     27. Stationery, stationary: These words are often confused.

  • Stationery refers to writing supplies, usually paper for writing letters.  Letter and stationery both have the letter “e” in them.
  • Stationary:  means it stays in a place, doesn’t move

     28.  Then and than are often confused although they don’t sound the same.

  • Then sounds like ehn. Then refers to time.  After this happened, then that happened.
  • Than sounds like ann and is a comparison word.  As in greater than or nicer than.   Usually you should not use it with different.  Usually you would say different from.

      29.  There, Their, They’re These are so often confused and yet are not that hard if                 you concentrate for a couple of minutes.

  • There is a place, like I set it there. There has here in it which is also a place.
  • Their (related to they) is a possessive pronoun for more than one person.  Their dresses were similar.
  • They’re is a contraction for they are, like they’re all going to the movie.

                 HINT – a spelling tip from one of my favorite composition instructors:  All                          three begin with the.

     30. Tome, Tomb

  • Tome is a large book.
  • Tomb (with a “b”) is a burial place. Tombif you bury someone they should be dead.

 

Halloween Project – Magic Spell Jar Directions

I’m thinking of making a “magic spell” jar for the grandkids for Halloween. 

Would be fairly simple:

  • Decorate a jar with Halloween colors and images – Use one with a mouth wide enough to dip into with hands
  • Label it magic spell jar
  • Drop in slips of “spells” – Just print the spells found under  “pages” to the right then click “Magic Spell Jar” and clip apart (one number per slip), which usually have two or three words bold words and a discussion of the words
  • Include instructions for removing one spell per day.

It is important to do one spell per day so the kids do not become overwhelmed or bored. Like magic most of the hints will stay with you, if you make a point of using the words two or three times on the day pulled.